Ingredients

Milk Thistle

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Written by Carl Lombard

What is Milk Thistle?

Milk thistle (Silybum marianum) has been used for 2,000 years as an herbal remedy for a variety of ailments, particularly liver, kidney, and gall bladder problems. Several scientific studies suggest that substances in milk thistle (especially a flavonoid called silymarin) protect the liver from toxins, including certain drugs, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), which can cause liver damage in high doses. Silymarin has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. And it may help the liver repair itself by growing new cells.

 

Milk thistle is native to the Mediterranean region. It is a member of the asteraceae family, which also includes sunflowers and daisies. It is now found throughout the world. This stout thistle usually grows in dry, sunny areas. Spiny stems branch at the top and reach heights of 5 to 10 feet. The leaves are wide with white blotches or veins. Milk thistle gets its name from the milky white sap that comes from the leaves when they are crushed. The flowers are red purple. The small, hard-skinned fruit is brown, spotted, and shiny. Milk thistle spreads quickly (it is considered a weed in some parts of the world), and it matures in less than a year.

The active ingredient — the one that protects the liver — in milk thistle is known as silymarin, a chemical extracted from the seeds. Silymarin is actually a group of flavonoids (silibinin, silidianin, and silicristin), which are thought to help repair liver cells damaged by alcohol and other toxic substances. Silymarin also protects new liver cells from being destroyed by these same toxins. It reduces inflammation (which is why it is often suggested for people with liver inflammation or hepatitis) and is a strong antioxidant.

Most milk thistle products are standardized preparations made from the seeds of the plant, to contain 70 to 80% of silymarin.

From umm.edu

Benefits of Milk Thistle

“Milk thistle is often suggested as a treatment for alcoholic hepatitis and alcoholic cirrhosis. Most studies show milk thistle improves liver function and increases survival in people with cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis.”

“Milk thistle is widely used in the treatment of viral hepatitis (particularly hepatitis C).”

“Based on traditional use, milk thistle has been used as an emergency antidote for poisoning by death cap mushroom (Amanita phalloides). Animal studies have found that milk thistle extract completely counteracts the toxic effects of the mushroom when given within 10 minutes of ingestion. If given within 24 hours, it significantly reduces the risk of liver damage and death.”

“Early laboratory studies suggest that silymarin and other active substances in milk thistle may have anti-cancer effects. These substances appear to:

– Stop cancer cells from dividing and reproducing
– Shorten the lifespan of cancer cells
– Reduce blood supply to tumors
Some studies suggest silymarin may favorably supplement sunscreen protection and may help reduce the risk of skin cancer. Other studies suggest milk thistle acts synergistically with chemotherapy.”

References

http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/milk-thistle

Available Forms

Capsules of standardized dried herb (each capsule contains about 120 to 140 mg of silymarin)
– Liquid extract
– Tincture
– Silymarin phosphatidylcholine complex
A few studies show that a silymarin-phosphatidylcholine complex may be absorbed more easily than regular standardized milk thistle. Phosphatidylcholine is a key element in cell membranes. It helps silymarin attach easily to cell membranes, which may keep toxins from getting inside liver cells. People who have alcohol-related liver disease should avoid alcohol extracts.

References

http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/milk-thistle

Precautions

The use of herbs is a time-honored approach to strengthening the body and treating disease. Herbs, however, can trigger side effects, and can interact with other herbs, supplements, or medications. For these reasons, you should take herbs with care, under the supervision of a health care practitioner.

Milk thistle is generally regarded as safe. Side effects are usually mild and may involve:

– Stomach upset
– Diarrhea
– Nausea and vomiting
– Rash (from touching milk thistle plants)
– Milk thistle should not be used by pregnant or breastfeeding women.

People with a history of hormone-related cancers, including breast, uterine, and prostate cancer, should not take milk thistle.

Do not take milk thistle if you are allergic to ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, chamomile, yarrow, or daisies.

References

http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/milk-thistle

From Wikipedia

Silybum marianum has other common names include cardus marianus, milk thistle,[1] blessed milkthistle,[2] Marian thistle, Mary thistle, Saint Mary’s thistle, Mediterranean milk thistle, variegated thistle and Scotch thistle. This species is an annual or biennial plant of the Asteraceae family. This fairly typical thistle has red to purple flowers and shiny pale green leaves with white veins. Originally a native of Southern Europe through to Asia, it is now found throughout the world.

Traditional milk thistle extract is made from the seeds, which contain approximately 4–6% silymarin.[7] The extract consists of about 65–80% silymarin (a flavonolignan complex) and 20–35% fatty acids, including linoleic acid.[8] Silymarin is a complex mixture of polyphenolic molecules, including seven closely related flavonolignans (silybin A, silybin B, isosilybin A, isosilybin B, silychristin, isosilychristin, silydianin) and one flavonoid (taxifolin).[8] Silibinin, a semipurified fraction of silymarin, is primarily a mixture of 2 diastereoisomers, silybin A and silybin B, in a roughly 1:1 ratio.[8][9]

Wikipedia

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Carl Lombard

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